Event Management: With A Project-Based Discipline
  Posted by: Chief Editor, Selmore - Get More Leads, on July 18, 2017 9:13 pm Leave your thoughts
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Managing an event successfully is a multi-disciplinary matter, which requires skillful handling.

Events are 'controlled environments' (...or at least they should be) within which a specialist project is being delivered. The many facets of events of all sizes, call for an array of professional business management skills and technical abilities in order to draw out the best results.

Event management is a combination of project management, with specialist knowledge of event organisation.

PRINCE 2 methodology delineates very clearly a comprehensive approach to handling projects of all sorts, including of course, events (both large and small).

The PRINCE 2 method itself is composed of 7 principles which govern the management of every project where this approach is deployed:

3 organisational layers: (1) Direction, (2) Management, (3) Delivery

...plus

4 process phases: (4) Start-Up, (5) Initiation, (6) Product Delivery, (7) Close

The organisation layers are the distinct levels of remit within the confines of the agreed project, within which all personnel are ring-fenced.

The process phases are the stepping-stones of activity which lead to the end product of delivering the planned results of the project. Each phase has its own focus and lends itself to maturing the project on, stage by stage, until all things expected come to fruition.

Here is a breakdown detailing exactly how these principles line up and drive home the desired results within your project:

(1) Direction Team

This is the executive head and decision-making unit of the entire operation. Its membership is representative of the investing organisation (sponsor) as well as management, typically with some delivery know-how to hand for understanding the risks and implications brought forward.

The direction panel, otherwise known in project management jargon as the 'project board' are the lead decision makers who authorise all as aspects of the delivery of the project, either directly, or as devolved via instruction to management or delivery personnel.

Authorisation by the project board is a formal enactment, and final once set, with briefs diligently prepared & presented by management, then evaluated in discussion and either granted or denied at the appointed meetings of the board.

Once decisions are made, management receive a documented response as sufficient for the matters aired and will steer the fulfillment of all and any necessary tasks/work to be performed by the delivery teams.

(2) Management Team

The project manager is the go to person for every project.

They are the pivotal person who receives the instruction from the directional team and interprets the directives and commands given as holding project board authority with all delivery team members.

In many ways they are the most critical person on the project team because they must carry the load at both ends of the project. Many projects have been made or broken on the effectiveness of the project manager. Because of this, the financial recompense for the right candidate can be very high.

Project managers perform a very delicate professional juggling act. In the sense that in one hand they carry the top-level instructions from the executive board meetings to the delivery teams. Therefore being able to communicate well in the most effective and encouraging fashion is a huge plus point.

Whilst project managers also must convincingly convey the grass-roots updates, compiled as reports, pertaining to project delivery before the board members in an honest, yet concise manner; providing all things necessary to facilitate the most informed decisions for the project's success.

(3) Delivery Team

The delivery function, is the engine room, work horse and/or nuts and bolts of the entire arrangement.

The delivery teams will cover every conceivable technical necessity of the project. The delivery teams can be departmental establishments within the sponsor organisation, specialist outsourced teams or freelancers for example, depending on the context.

They will have input into the various communications shared between management and direction teams and will offer expertise as guidance for issues such as feasibility, for example.

The bottleneck constraints on whether the project will be delivered on time, or not, can in many cases largely depend on the resource availability and competencies of your delivery teams.

As often happens in many a project, there are at times seemingly insurmountable obstacles which arise, and sometimes are more of a technical nature.

This is where the experience and expertise of your technical heads can really pay dividend.

(4) Start-Up Phase

At this stage the project is still prospective and it is not as yet certain if the resources will be committed by the project sponsor to make it a reality.

At this stage, the idea of a project is still largely hypothetical, but the seriousness of assembling a mount at achieving the proposed idea, begins to take shape - on paper at least.

This is very much an investigative period with many questions asked before any commitments are made to ensure that the benefits desired truly outweigh the costs involved and that the end is entirely feasible.

The formal communication here is the 'business plan' which outlines the problem and the approach to building a solution. To be successful, the business case must instill confidence, that is to say, offer a tangible assurance that what is enclosed is a genuine and do-able opportunity to overcome the problem in hand.

Once the business case is finally drafted, it is presented before the project board and any expert panel of advisors who are at hand to grant understanding surrounding more challenging topics.

The executive project board then having heard all the supporting arguments, provide a final judgment on the matter, either approving or rejecting the business case.

If rejected, the business case can be amended for review or entirely discharged. If approved, however, the project officially begins and enters what is called 'project initiation'.

(5) Project Initiation

This is the official grand opening of a project. The fundamental document which leads the entire operation into being is the 'project initiation document'.

The project initiation document suffices as a high level summary of the entire matter and touches upon the several aspects of the project in enough detail to give a solid appreciation of what is being planned, how it will be achieved, by whom, when and where it will be done...amongst other points, including how much it will cost, for example.

Once defined, the project initiation document is distributed to all stakeholders as a fundamental starting/reference point for the agreed commitment to pursue the project's goal.

This is essentially the kick-off every one has been waiting for.

(6) Product Delivery

This is where it all happens.

The driving purpose behind every project is the delivery of a product or products. Some desirable end-point which is hoped for by the project stakeholders for the giving of benefits. In the case of an event, it is a hospitality experience planned for guests social or professional enjoyment, to take place on a given date or dates.

The staff on hand who make it happen are effectively the doers of all planned work. Their work is divided into meaningful packets of tasks which have integrity, known as 'work packages'. These work packages have a defined beginning, middle and end.

Resources required to perform the work are allocated, calculated and costed along with any tools or instruments needed to facilitate bringing forth the fruit of the project.

Throughout the process of bringing the project to fruit there are definable stages, which grant close control for the navigation from start to finish. With managed end points at each stage, the management team and project board ensure each identified milestone grants opportunity for highly senstive evaluation of the progress made by the delivery team.

The progress reporting during delivery can sway confidence or general investor outlook, much like market trade reports can move the stock market. Changes and risks are delicately managed here also and brought to light for dealing with by those carrying authority in the project.

(7) Close

Once the fruit has been harvested within a project, the whole matter is brought to a formal close.

As part of delivery, quality assurance will be performed which attributes a measured, technical score to every deliverable and rates this in comparison to the expected results. When ranked for success, all delivery stages are formally closed before putting the fruits to the test.

In the closing phase, there is time for reflection on the course taken, including lessons learned which might just grant the benefit of experience on future projects.

Once signed off by the project board, all project activity comes to an end with all stakeholders officially notified.

Does this approach work with event environments?

Events are projects just like any other, with a group of multi-disciplinary teams all collaborating for the achievement of a common goal...pleased guests!

The variables involved like time and budget for example, can make great impact upon the final result.

Planning how best to control these elements for the desired outcome is a prudent move and adhering to a proven project management methodology like PRINCE 2, can offer great stability for getting to grips with the minutiae of your event.

Flexibility is one important benefit of using PRINCE 2, for example. It accounts for risk and change, as are common features of projects of all sorts in real life, and as a framework offering real responsiveness to challenges as and when they occur.

Events can be unpredictable. Yet with so much resting on 'it being all right on the night', so to speak, a solid approach to project management in events can make all the difference.







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Managing an event successfully is a multi-disciplinary matter, which requires skillful handling.

Events are 'controlled environments' (...or at least they should be) within which a specialist project is being delivered. The many facets of events of all sizes, call for an array of professional business management skills and technical abilities in order to draw out the best results.

Event management is a combination of project management, with specialist knowledge of event organisation.

PRINCE 2 methodology delineates very clearly a comprehensive approach to handling projects of all sorts, including of course, events (both large and small).

The PRINCE 2 method itself is composed of 7 principles which govern the management of every project where this approach is deployed:

3 organisational layers: (1) Direction, (2) Management, (3) Delivery

...plus

4 process phases: (4) Start-Up, (5) Initiation, (6) Product Delivery, (7) Close

The organisation layers are the distinct levels of remit within the confines of the agreed project, within which all personnel are ring-fenced.

The process phases are the stepping-stones of activity which lead to the end product of delivering the planned results of the project. Each phase has its own focus and lends itself to maturing the project on, stage by stage, until all things expected come to fruition.

Here is a breakdown detailing exactly how these principles line up and drive home the desired results within your project:

(1) Direction Team

This is the executive head and decision-making unit of the entire operation. Its membership is representative of the investing organisation (sponsor) as well as management, typically with some delivery know-how to hand for understanding the risks and implications brought forward.

The direction panel, otherwise known in project management jargon as the 'project board' are the lead decision makers who authorise all as aspects of the delivery of the project, either directly, or as devolved via instruction to management or delivery personnel.

Authorisation by the project board is a formal enactment, and final once set, with briefs diligently prepared & presented by management, then evaluated in discussion and either granted or denied at the appointed meetings of the board.

Once decisions are made, management receive a documented response as sufficient for the matters aired and will steer the fulfillment of all and any necessary tasks/work to be performed by the delivery teams.

(2) Management Team

The project manager is the go to person for every project.

They are the pivotal person who receives the instruction from the directional team and interprets the directives and commands given as holding project board authority with all delivery team members.

In many ways they are the most critical person on the project team because they must carry the load at both ends of the project. Many projects have been made or broken on the effectiveness of the project manager. Because of this, the financial recompense for the right candidate can be very high.

Project managers perform a very delicate professional juggling act. In the sense that in one hand they carry the top-level instructions from the executive board meetings to the delivery teams. Therefore being able to communicate well in the most effective and encouraging fashion is a huge plus point.

Whilst project managers also must convincingly convey the grass-roots updates, compiled as reports, pertaining to project delivery before the board members in an honest, yet concise manner; providing all things necessary to facilitate the most informed decisions for the project's success.

(3) Delivery Team

The delivery function, is the engine room, work horse and/or nuts and bolts of the entire arrangement.

The delivery teams will cover every conceivable technical necessity of the project. The delivery teams can be departmental establishments within the sponsor organisation, specialist outsourced teams or freelancers for example, depending on the context.

They will have input into the various communications shared between management and direction teams and will offer expertise as guidance for issues such as feasibility, for example.

The bottleneck constraints on whether the project will be delivered on time, or not, can in many cases largely depend on the resource availability and competencies of your delivery teams.

As often happens in many a project, there are at times seemingly insurmountable obstacles which arise, and sometimes are more of a technical nature.

This is where the experience and expertise of your technical heads can really pay dividend.

(4) Start-Up Phase

At this stage the project is still prospective and it is not as yet certain if the resources will be committed by the project sponsor to make it a reality.

At this stage, the idea of a project is still largely hypothetical, but the seriousness of assembling a mount at achieving the proposed idea, begins to take shape - on paper at least.

This is very much an investigative period with many questions asked before any commitments are made to ensure that the benefits desired truly outweigh the costs involved and that the end is entirely feasible.

The formal communication here is the 'business plan' which outlines the problem and the approach to building a solution. To be successful, the business case must instill confidence, that is to say, offer a tangible assurance that what is enclosed is a genuine and do-able opportunity to overcome the problem in hand.

Once the business case is finally drafted, it is presented before the project board and any expert panel of advisors who are at hand to grant understanding surrounding more challenging topics.

The executive project board then having heard all the supporting arguments, provide a final judgment on the matter, either approving or rejecting the business case.

If rejected, the business case can be amended for review or entirely discharged. If approved, however, the project officially begins and enters what is called 'project initiation'.

(5) Project Initiation

This is the official grand opening of a project. The fundamental document which leads the entire operation into being is the 'project initiation document'.

The project initiation document suffices as a high level summary of the entire matter and touches upon the several aspects of the project in enough detail to give a solid appreciation of what is being planned, how it will be achieved, by whom, when and where it will be done...amongst other points, including how much it will cost, for example.

Once defined, the project initiation document is distributed to all stakeholders as a fundamental starting/reference point for the agreed commitment to pursue the project's goal.

This is essentially the kick-off every one has been waiting for.

(6) Product Delivery

This is where it all happens.

The driving purpose behind every project is the delivery of a product or products. Some desirable end-point which is hoped for by the project stakeholders for the giving of benefits. In the case of an event, it is a hospitality experience planned for guests social or professional enjoyment, to take place on a given date or dates.

The staff on hand who make it happen are effectively the doers of all planned work. Their work is divided into meaningful packets of tasks which have integrity, known as 'work packages'. These work packages have a defined beginning, middle and end.

Resources required to perform the work are allocated, calculated and costed along with any tools or instruments needed to facilitate bringing forth the fruit of the project.

Throughout the process of bringing the project to fruit there are definable stages, which grant close control for the navigation from start to finish. With managed end points at each stage, the management team and project board ensure each identified milestone grants opportunity for highly senstive evaluation of the progress made by the delivery team.

The progress reporting during delivery can sway confidence or general investor outlook, much like market trade reports can move the stock market. Changes and risks are delicately managed here also and brought to light for dealing with by those carrying authority in the project.

(7) Close

Once the fruit has been harvested within a project, the whole matter is brought to a formal close.

As part of delivery, quality assurance will be performed which attributes a measured, technical score to every deliverable and rates this in comparison to the expected results. When ranked for success, all delivery stages are formally closed before putting the fruits to the test.

In the closing phase, there is time for reflection on the course taken, including lessons learned which might just grant the benefit of experience on future projects.

Once signed off by the project board, all project activity comes to an end with all stakeholders officially notified.

Does this approach work with event environments?

Events are projects just like any other, with a group of multi-disciplinary teams all collaborating for the achievement of a common goal...pleased guests!

The variables involved like time and budget for example, can make great impact upon the final result.

Planning how best to control these elements for the desired outcome is a prudent move and adhering to a proven project management methodology like PRINCE 2, can offer great stability for getting to grips with the minutiae of your event.

Flexibility is one important benefit of using PRINCE 2, for example. It accounts for risk and change, as are common features of projects of all sorts in real life, and as a framework offering real responsiveness to challenges as and when they occur.

Events can be unpredictable. Yet with so much resting on 'it being all right on the night', so to speak, a solid approach to project management in events can make all the difference.







Subscribe To The Selmore Event Hire Blog:





Categorised in:

This post was written by selmore

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


Managing an event successfully is a multi-disciplinary matter, which requires skillful handling.

Events are 'controlled environments' (...or at least they should be) within which a specialist project is being delivered. The many facets of events of all sizes, call for an array of professional business management skills and technical abilities in order to draw out the best results.

Event management is a combination of project management, with specialist knowledge of event organisation.

PRINCE 2 methodology delineates very clearly a comprehensive approach to handling projects of all sorts, including of course, events (both large and small).

The PRINCE 2 method itself is composed of 7 principles which govern the management of every project where this approach is deployed:

3 organisational layers: (1) Direction, (2) Management, (3) Delivery

...plus

4 process phases: (4) Start-Up, (5) Initiation, (6) Product Delivery, (7) Close

The organisation layers are the distinct levels of remit within the confines of the agreed project, within which all personnel are ring-fenced.

The process phases are the stepping-stones of activity which lead to the end product of delivering the planned results of the project. Each phase has its own focus and lends itself to maturing the project on, stage by stage, until all things expected come to fruition.

Here is a breakdown detailing exactly how these principles line up and drive home the desired results within your project:

(1) Direction Team

This is the executive head and decision-making unit of the entire operation. Its membership is representative of the investing organisation (sponsor) as well as management, typically with some delivery know-how to hand for understanding the risks and implications brought forward.

The direction panel, otherwise known in project management jargon as the 'project board' are the lead decision makers who authorise all as aspects of the delivery of the project, either directly, or as devolved via instruction to management or delivery personnel.

Authorisation by the project board is a formal enactment, and final once set, with briefs diligently prepared & presented by management, then evaluated in discussion and either granted or denied at the appointed meetings of the board.

Once decisions are made, management receive a documented response as sufficient for the matters aired and will steer the fulfillment of all and any necessary tasks/work to be performed by the delivery teams.

(2) Management Team

The project manager is the go to person for every project.

They are the pivotal person who receives the instruction from the directional team and interprets the directives and commands given as holding project board authority with all delivery team members.

In many ways they are the most critical person on the project team because they must carry the load at both ends of the project. Many projects have been made or broken on the effectiveness of the project manager. Because of this, the financial recompense for the right candidate can be very high.

Project managers perform a very delicate professional juggling act. In the sense that in one hand they carry the top-level instructions from the executive board meetings to the delivery teams. Therefore being able to communicate well in the most effective and encouraging fashion is a huge plus point.

Whilst project managers also must convincingly convey the grass-roots updates, compiled as reports, pertaining to project delivery before the board members in an honest, yet concise manner; providing all things necessary to facilitate the most informed decisions for the project's success.

(3) Delivery Team

The delivery function, is the engine room, work horse and/or nuts and bolts of the entire arrangement.

The delivery teams will cover every conceivable technical necessity of the project. The delivery teams can be departmental establishments within the sponsor organisation, specialist outsourced teams or freelancers for example, depending on the context.

They will have input into the various communications shared between management and direction teams and will offer expertise as guidance for issues such as feasibility, for example.

The bottleneck constraints on whether the project will be delivered on time, or not, can in many cases largely depend on the resource availability and competencies of your delivery teams.

As often happens in many a project, there are at times seemingly insurmountable obstacles which arise, and sometimes are more of a technical nature.

This is where the experience and expertise of your technical heads can really pay dividend.

(4) Start-Up Phase

At this stage the project is still prospective and it is not as yet certain if the resources will be committed by the project sponsor to make it a reality.

At this stage, the idea of a project is still largely hypothetical, but the seriousness of assembling a mount at achieving the proposed idea, begins to take shape - on paper at least.

This is very much an investigative period with many questions asked before any commitments are made to ensure that the benefits desired truly outweigh the costs involved and that the end is entirely feasible.

The formal communication here is the 'business plan' which outlines the problem and the approach to building a solution. To be successful, the business case must instill confidence, that is to say, offer a tangible assurance that what is enclosed is a genuine and do-able opportunity to overcome the problem in hand.

Once the business case is finally drafted, it is presented before the project board and any expert panel of advisors who are at hand to grant understanding surrounding more challenging topics.

The executive project board then having heard all the supporting arguments, provide a final judgment on the matter, either approving or rejecting the business case.

If rejected, the business case can be amended for review or entirely discharged. If approved, however, the project officially begins and enters what is called 'project initiation'.

(5) Project Initiation

This is the official grand opening of a project. The fundamental document which leads the entire operation into being is the 'project initiation document'.

The project initiation document suffices as a high level summary of the entire matter and touches upon the several aspects of the project in enough detail to give a solid appreciation of what is being planned, how it will be achieved, by whom, when and where it will be done...amongst other points, including how much it will cost, for example.

Once defined, the project initiation document is distributed to all stakeholders as a fundamental starting/reference point for the agreed commitment to pursue the project's goal.

This is essentially the kick-off every one has been waiting for.

(6) Product Delivery

This is where it all happens.

The driving purpose behind every project is the delivery of a product or products. Some desirable end-point which is hoped for by the project stakeholders for the giving of benefits. In the case of an event, it is a hospitality experience planned for guests social or professional enjoyment, to take place on a given date or dates.

The staff on hand who make it happen are effectively the doers of all planned work. Their work is divided into meaningful packets of tasks which have integrity, known as 'work packages'. These work packages have a defined beginning, middle and end.

Resources required to perform the work are allocated, calculated and costed along with any tools or instruments needed to facilitate bringing forth the fruit of the project.

Throughout the process of bringing the project to fruit there are definable stages, which grant close control for the navigation from start to finish. With managed end points at each stage, the management team and project board ensure each identified milestone grants opportunity for highly senstive evaluation of the progress made by the delivery team.

The progress reporting during delivery can sway confidence or general investor outlook, much like market trade reports can move the stock market. Changes and risks are delicately managed here also and brought to light for dealing with by those carrying authority in the project.

(7) Close

Once the fruit has been harvested within a project, the whole matter is brought to a formal close.

As part of delivery, quality assurance will be performed which attributes a measured, technical score to every deliverable and rates this in comparison to the expected results. When ranked for success, all delivery stages are formally closed before putting the fruits to the test.

In the closing phase, there is time for reflection on the course taken, including lessons learned which might just grant the benefit of experience on future projects.

Once signed off by the project board, all project activity comes to an end with all stakeholders officially notified.

Does this approach work with event environments?

Events are projects just like any other, with a group of multi-disciplinary teams all collaborating for the achievement of a common goal...pleased guests!

The variables involved like time and budget for example, can make great impact upon the final result.

Planning how best to control these elements for the desired outcome is a prudent move and adhering to a proven project management methodology like PRINCE 2, can offer great stability for getting to grips with the minutiae of your event.

Flexibility is one important benefit of using PRINCE 2, for example. It accounts for risk and change, as are common features of projects of all sorts in real life, and as a framework offering real responsiveness to challenges as and when they occur.

Events can be unpredictable. Yet with so much resting on 'it being all right on the night', so to speak, a solid approach to project management in events can make all the difference.







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